test!

Test! This is a test…of the emergency broadcast system…this is only a test.  My childhood television viewing was sometimes interrupted by the high-pitched 60 second buzz.  A communication system for our President in the event of an actual emergency, these interruptions kept us alert to the ever-present Soviet nuclear threat during the sixties.

The Bible talks a lot about tests.  A test shows one’s strengths and weaknesses.  Any good coach or teacher tests their students.  In John 6, todays’ reading in our 21-Day Experiment, Jesus gives a pop-quiz to Philip.  I’m intrigued by their encounter, so I’ve chosen these verses as my watchword for today:

Jesus soon saw a huge crowd of people coming to look for him. Turning to Philip, he asked,“Where can we buy bread to feed all these people?”  He was testing Philip, for he already knew what he was going to do (John 6:5,6).

Philip replied that even if the disciples “worked for months,”  it would be impossible to feed all those people.   True enough, if one is looking at this dilemma from merely an earthly perspective.  Jesus wanted Philip look at the situation from heaven’s vantage point.  To trust Him to bring heaven’s resources to bear upon earth’s problems.

Jesus’ miracle feeding of the thousands was startling and dramatic.  He took a young boy’s lunch of just five loaves and two fish  and looking to heaven as the source of His miracle, He provided an abundance with baskets of food left over.

The crowds who had seen the miracle later asked Jesus, “What must we do to do the works God requires?” Jesus answered, “The work of God is this: to believe in the one He has sent” (John 6:28,29).

Perhaps you have a situation in your life today that looks impossible when you consider your earthly resources.  What would happen if you looked at your problem from heaven’s vantage point?  What if you believed in Jesus’ ability to bring heaven’s resources to meet your needs?

Trust  Jesus.  That’s the answer to Philip’s pop-quiz. And it’s our daily job description.  Something to think about.


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